Photo Reprints
When the U.S. Government was in York
Date: 7/29/2012 Album ID: 1509265
George Washington and his troops in Valley Forge spent winter of 1777-8 watching the British, which had captured Philadelphia. Almost 2,000 people died at Valley Forge, but not in battle. Bil Bowden photos
While in Continental Army gear, Marc Brier, a Valley Forge National Historical Park ranger, talks with visitors to the park about the fact and fiction of the site. 
George Washington and his troops in Valley Forge spent winter of 1777 watching the British, which had captured Philadelphia. Almost 2,000 people died at Valley Forge, but not in battle. Bowden photo.
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While in Continental Army gear, park rangers wait for visitors to the park who will probably askWhere was the battle?
George Washington and his troops in Valley Forge spent winter of 1777 watching the British, which had captured Philadelphia. Almost 2,000 people died at Valley Forge, but not in battle.
Bil Bowden photo.
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While in Continental Army gear, Marc Brier, a Valley Forge National Historical Park ranger, fires a rifle during a soldier seminar at the Muhlenberg Brigade line.
George Washington and his troops in Valley Forge spent winter of 1777 watching the British, which had captured Philadelphia. Almost 2,000 people died at Valley Forge, but not in battle.
Bil Bowden photo.
Email Page to FriendBuy this PhotoEnlarge this Photo
While in Continental Army gear, Marc Brier, a Valley Forge National Historical Park ranger, waits for visitors to ask about accoutrements sitting on the ground near him.


George Washington and his troops in Valley Forge spent winter of 1777 watching the British, which had captured Philadelphia. Almost 2,000 people died at Valley Forge, but not in battle.
Bil Bowden photo.
Email Page to FriendBuy this PhotoEnlarge this Photo